Mgr Gerard’s reflection: 2nd Sunday of Lent – Transfiguration

Transfiguration is a name we give to our breakthrough moments. It can be as simple as discovering a solution to a vexing problem or as horrific as watching the Twin Towers collapse. It can be Martin Luther King saying “I have been to the mountain top and seen his glory” and we know that integration will happen.

There is no planning for the transfigurations that enrich our lives. All of us have experienced some degree of transfiguration. We just need to let ourselves be caught up in the moment and become lost in the experience.

It is like receiving the Body of Christ. It is quite awesome to think we are receiving Christ because the host is more than bread. We should always say “Amen” with such profound reverence. God gives us rare moments when we hear more than is being said and see more than is obvious. During Lent and beyond how can we better treasure these moments of grace?

Mgr Gerard’s reflection – 1st Sunday of Lent

Jesus was tempted in the desert. It’s not so easy to understand how Jesus and temptation can come together but we are told clearly that Jesus was like us in all things except sin.

To me, it seems when we are faced with learning to believe, that Jesus Christ really was a man living in the same world that we inhabit today. He had all the human emotions: affection, love, fear, anger and so on. In use of his mind, his body, his heart he was free as we are free, but when tempted he never chose himself rather than his father’s will.

Like him we are free, but when tempted unlike him we often choose our will rather than God’s and this can lead to sin. But God is with us in our struggles always helping us to overcome them.

St. Augustine says: “it is through temptation that we come to know ourselves. We cannot win our crown unless we overcome and we cannot overcome unless we enter the contest and there is no contest unless we have an enemy and the temptation he brings.”

Mgr Gerard’s Reflection – Beginning of Lent

Forty days of Lent from Ash Wednesday to Holy Saturday is a period traditionally for prayer, fasting and doing special good works. The number forty comes from the Lord’s fasting recorded in the gospels and earlier generations associated Lent with giving up things like sweets or some luxury. The key question is to make Lent meaningful and that we undertake to do or give something up for the whole period. If we do not set down something special and be content with, “I shall be good during Lent” nothing much is likely to result. We also need to look at conversion, where do I fail?, in what areas do I need to be more generous?, where do I need the Lord’s healing love?

Fr Richard’s reflection – Martyrs’ witness to love of enemy (7th Sunday of Ordinary Time)

Some of the greatest exponents of Our Lord’s command to “love your enemy” that spring to mind (aside, of course, from the greatest example of Jesus Himself) are the martyrs of England and Wales. Many of these faithful men and women, seconds before facing the horror of being hanged, drawn and quartered, begged God’s forgiveness for the executioners, priest-catchers, and indeed the monarch.

Look no further that the very last words of our very own Blessed Nicholas Postgate: “Mr Sheriff, I do not die for the plot but for my Catholic religion. Be pleased to acquaint His Majesty that I have never offended him in any way. I pray God to give him His grace and the light of truth. I forgive all who have in any way wronged me and brought me to this death, and I desire the forgiveness of all the people.”

The witness of the ‘martyr of the moors’ provides a fine example for us of Jesus’ instruction to “bless those who curse you, pray for those who treat you badly.” Safe in the knowledge that we won’t be treated as badly as the martyrs were, let us ask for their intercession that we may have the humility to love those who hate us.